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Squid Ink in Dentistry?

Your future dentist visits could become a pleasant pain-free experience, and it's all thanks to squids. A team of engineers from the University of California San Diego have developed an imaging method using squid ink and ultrasound to check for gum disease. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been promoting periodontal health for over 30 years. If you've ever had to get your mouth checked for gum issues, you know that the current method to assess gum health involves inserting a periodontal probe's metal hook in between your gums and teeth. Sometimes, depending on the dentist's technique your pain tolerance, it hurts. The team's method eliminates the need for probing -- you simply need to gargle some food-grade squid ink mixed with water and cornstarch. Squid ink is rich in melanin nanoparticles, and those get trapped in the pockets between your teeth and gums. When a dentist shines a laser onto your mouth, the nanoparticles swell and create pressure differences in the gum pockets. That's where the ultrasound part of the imaging method comes in. Ultrasound can detect those pockets, so dentists can create a full map of your mouth. The result shows how deep those pockets are, which indicate gum health. That's why dentists stick a probe in those pockets to begin with -- if they're only one to three millimeters in depth, it means your gums are healthy. Anything deeper than that is a sign of gum disease, and the deeper those pockets are, the worse the issue is. Problem is, the results of periodontal probing depend on the amount of pressure a dentist uses and the area he's probing. He could be probing the wrong location or putting too little or too much pressure. Jesse Jokerst, the study's senior author likened the periodontal probe to "examining a dark room with just a flashlight" wherein "you can only see one area at a time." He said that their method is more like "flipping on all the light switches so you can see the entire room all at once," leading to more accurate findings. The engineers have big plans for their creation, starting with replacing the lasers in the method with more affordable LED lights. Their ultimate goal, however, is to create a mouthpiece that can instantly assess your gum health. They also want to get rid of the the squid ink concoction's salty and bitter taste, though I'll take than any day over painful probing. So until the, Dr. Johnson reminds his patients to have regular, preventative visits with the hygienist. Brush and floss daily…remember, “you only have to clean the teeth you wish to keep”. For more blogs by Dr. Johnson or to contact him directly, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org   orginal article:  https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/squid-ink-could-dentist-visits-140000793.html

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Dental Problems Related to Scuba Diving – Newton, Wellesley, MA

A new survey of recreational scuba divers finds that 41 percent report dental problems related to diving. Most of the problems had to do with pain from the increased pressure underwater or from clutching the air regulator too tightly in their mouths, but a few people experienced loosened crowns or cracked fillings.  ryneDr. Ryne Johnson,  prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners reports that, “over my 30 years in clinical practice, I have seen numerous patient who presented with broken or shifted teeth induced by long-time use of a regulator”.  He further recommends, “The survey was limited, but suggests that people should make sure their teeth are in good shape before they go deep.  An unhealthy tooth underwater would be much more obvious than on the surface.  One hundred feet underwater is the last place you want to be with a fractured tooth."

Underwater toothache

Barodontalgia is a toothache caused by the increase in pressure felt underwater (it can also happen at high altitudes because of low pressure). The condition, which occurs while the person is in the high- or low-pressure environment, is most common in people who have some sort of underlying dental condition, like a cavity or poorly completed filling.  project1

Forty-one percent of respondents of a recent study said they'd experienced dental symptoms while diving. Of those, 42 percent said they'd had barodontalgia. The second-most common symptom was pain from holding the air regulator too tightly (24 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom), and the third-most common problem was jaw pain (22 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom).

Protecting your teeth

Several people reported that a dental crown — a cap that fits over a broken or damaged tooth — had loosened during a dive. One person reported a broken filling.  The dry air and awkward position of the jaw while clenching down on the regulator is an interesting mix. Dive instructors reported more pain and problems than casual divers.  Instructors spend more time at shallower diving depths, where the changes in pressure are most abrupt.

Divers are required to meet a standard of medical fitness before certification, but there are no dental health prerequisites," according to Dr. Johnson.  In the meantime, divers can protect themselves by visiting the dentist before scuba diving to check for decay and other problems.

For more blogs by Dr. Johnson, Click Here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, Click Here

Original article: http://www.livescience.com Artwork: www.scubadiving.com

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E-Cigarettes as bad the Real Ones? – Newton, Wellesely, MA

Former and would-be smokers who opt for electronic cigarettes may not be doing their teeth a whole lot of good, according to a new study.  Dr. Ryne Johnson, ryneprosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been educating his patients on the harmful effects of smoking on dental tissues for 30 years.  "Many have shifted toward the e-cigarettes thinking that they are a ‘safe’ alternative but new evidence suggests that both may increase the likelihood of gum disease".

However, research published in the journal Oncotarget, which focuses on cancer-related issues, suggests that electronic cigarette smoke may wreak the same type of havoc on teeth and gums that conventional tobacco does. A team of scientists from the University of Rochester and Stony Brook University found that the vapors released in e-cigarettes can cause tissue inflammation and damage comparable to that produces by regular ones.

Furthermore, chemicals used to flavor some e-cigs may cause even more harm to mouth tissue, the researchers say.  project1

Some caveats: This particular experiment was conducted on gum tissue, not live human participants. It’s possible that there are other confounding factors that may contribute to gum disease and in e-cig and regular cigarette users alike.

But it’s the latest example of scientific skepticism surrounding the health benefits of e-cigarettes. Manufacturers claim that they are an obviously superior alternative to conventional products that contain known carcinogens; but the overall public health ramifications of the products remain unclear, including whether or not they may actually be encouraging more kids to smoke.

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here To contact the office or reach Dr. Johnson, click here

Original article:  http://fortune.com/2016/11/17/e-cigarettes-yellow-teeth-study/ Artwork: www.motherjones.com

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Dental Implants & Medications – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Each year, about 500,000 North Americans get dental implants. Dr. Ryne Johnson, ryneprosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, considered by many as a pioneer in the synergistic use of computers in implant dentistry says, “If you are one of them, and are preparing to have a dental implant, it might be a good idea to start taking beta blockers, medication that controls high blood pressure, for a while. And to stop taking heartburn pills”.

A body of research indicates that in order to raise the odds that dental implants will attach properly, there are clear benefits to taking certain common medications and avoiding others.

Bone cell growth, healing and death

"The success of procedures like dental implants depends mainly on how the existing bone accepts the implants to create a connection between the living bone and the surface of the implant," says Dr. Johnson, who has been involved in implant dentistry since 1988. "Because some medications affect bone metabolism and the way that bone cells heal and multiply or die, they can have an important effect on the success of implants."project3

A McGill research team reviewed data about the integration of dental implants gathered from over 700 patients. They then confirmed the results they saw in human patients through studies in rats.

Implications for hip and knee replacements

"We believe that this research may have implications for orthopedic interventions such as hip and knee replacements, because the same mechanisms of bone cell growth break down, and healing take place in all the bones in the body," says one of the researchers. "Our work with implants in rats suggest that this is indeed the case, but further research will be needed to confirm it."

Drugs that aid integration of implants - Beta blockers

  • Conclusions are based on 1499 dental implants in 728 patients between Jan. 2007 -- Sept. 2013 at the East Coast Oral Surgery in Moncton, New Brunswick
  • 327 implants were in 142 people who took beta blockers for hypertension
  • 1172 implants were in 586 people who didn't take beta blockers
  • Failure rates of implants for people using beta blockers was 0.6%
  • Failure rates of implants in people who don't take beta blockers was 4.1%
  • More than 640 million patients around the world take beta blockers to control hypertension.

"We carried out this study because we knew that beta blockers have been reported to increase bone formation," says Prof. Tamimi from McGill's Faculty of Dentistry. "So we thought it was possible that they would also decrease the risk of failure of dental implants. However we didn't expect that there would be such a clear difference in the failure rates for implants between users and non-users of beta blockers. Randomized clinical trials will need to be carried out as well as other studies of large numbers of patients to investigate this phenomenon in more depth."

Drugs that impede integration of dental implants - Heartburn treatment

  • Conclusions are based on 1773 dental implants in 799 patients between Jan. 2007 -- Sept. 2015 at the East Coast Oral Surgery in Moncton, New Brunswick
  • 133 implants were in 58 people who took heartburn medication
  • 1640 implants were in 741 people who don't take heartburn medication
  • Failure rates of implants for people using heartburn medication were 6.8%
  • Failure rates of implants for people not taking heartburn medication were 3.2%
  • More than 20 million Americans, about one in 14 people, take heartburn medication.
  • Heartburn medication is rapidly becoming the third most prescribed pharmaceutical product worldwide, especially for elderly people, who take it either on an occasional or long-term basis.

"Scientists already knew that drugs for heartburn reduce calcium absorption in bones and generally increase the risk of bone fractures," says Dr. Tamimi, of McGill's Faculty of Dentistry. "That is why we wanted to look at how it affects the integration of implants and bone healing after this type of surgery. But we didn't expect to find that the negative effects of these type of drugs would be as great as they are. Further work will need to be done to find the appropriate dosages and time periods that people should take or avoid these medications."

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here

To learn more about Dental Implants, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Original article:  www.eurekalert.org

Artwork: www.medicalxpress.com

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Dental Implants Failures – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Dental implants are now used widely around the globe.  However, questions about patient risk assessment prior to placing the implants still abound. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners asks, “What causes implants to fail in some patients but not others?

There are several factors which negatively influence implant predictability:

1. Gum and Bone Disease:  The placement of implants in a patient with periodontal disease would be one relevant concern. Resproject1earchers from Sweden performed a systematic review to determine if persons with periodontitis are more susceptible to peri-implantitis. The conclusion was that an increased susceptibility for periodontitis may also confer an increased risk for implant loss, loss of supporting bone, and postoperative infection.

2. Smoking: A recently published study discussedproject2 the effectiveness of implant treatment in a large patient population nine years after treatment. They used a large and randomly selected patient sample, and concluded that patient characteristics and implant features affect results. They discovered that smokers and patients with an initial diagnosis of periodontitis were at higher risk of implant loss. A 2014 study confirmed that placement of implants in smokers pointedly affected implant failure rates, the risk of postoperative infections, and marginal bone loss.

3. Shoproject3rt Implants: Those with implants shorter than 6 mm and implants using particular brands of products also showed increased risk.

project4

4. Teeth Grinding:  Several studies have clearly demonstrated an increased failure rate on patient with nocturnal bruxism.  The off-axis forces delivered to implants in people who grind their teeth can be significant and will over-stress the bone.

Dr. Johnson is considered a pioneer in the synergistic use of computers in dental implant dentistry and performed his first implant reconstruction in 1988.

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here For more information on dental implants, Contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Original article in www.dentistryiq.com, Artwork: www.pintrest.com, www.implantninja.com, www.slideshare.com, www.ceraroot.com

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